Data Analysis

Using open-source software to make sense of small big data, published in Quirk’s Media, describes how to use new capabilities with traditional marketing research deliverables.

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The Quirk’s Marketing Research Review article, Data Fusion – How Researchers Can Create C – Suite Deliverables, discusses interpretations and presentation of predictive analytics and marketing research, which both employ data scientists.

A cruise line example illustrates how to use discrete choice to determine marginal value in this piece published in Quirk’s Marketing Research Review, How to Price an Island.

Twitter Network Analysis: Nordstrom at the Center of Resistance?, published in Greenbook, examines how visualization of social networks is now coming online to make sense of Big Data and convey the results of analyses through emerging, open-source programs.

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Tandem Segmentation – Getting Your Product to Sell Itself describes how conducting a factor analysis followed by a cluster analysis improves market ROI.

Michael Lieberman’s Quirk’s Marketing Research Review article, Using NodeXL to Visualize Social Media, demonstrates how to leverage social networks for promotion using the NodeXL open-source Excel add-on tool.

Regression Analysis – Predicting Key Drivers analyzes a studies in which the client sought to uncover the attribute or attributes among those you measured that best define your client’s customer satisfaction, usage drivers, or leading cause of switching to a competitor’s brand.

How the Performance Score Can Simplify Data examines a wide range of data can be simplified.

A Good Choice for Choice Modeling looks at the Max-Diff option.

A Walk Through Discriminant Analysis explores choosing predictor variables.

A Look Inside the Choice Toolbox examines how to select the most appropriate choice model from these five most commonly used ones: Paid-comparison Analysis, Conjoint Analysis, Discrete Choice Modeling, Max-Diff, and Adaptive Choice Analysis.

Helping Wrangle Big Data: Monte Carlo for Marketing Research explains the usefulness of Monte Carlo simulations for ROI, loyalty, product development, customer satisfaction and regression modeling.

Steering the Vote – The Case of the Oglala Sioux Casino explains how regression analysis can indicate which issues in a referendum campaign motivate supporters and which move voters to become supporters.

Small Data Visualization by Michael Lieberman presents two examples for examining primary research – a two-step cluster analysis and a data-mining example that takes existing consumer purchase data and reports the items in which the client should specialize to connect to the greatest number of other products.

Design Performance – The Kano Model, published in Quirk’s Marketing Research Review, offers insight into product attributes perceived to be important to customers. The purpose of the tool is to support product specification and discussion through better development team understanding on differentiating product features, as opposed to focusing initially on customer needs, then forming strategic communications to meet those needs.

Tacos in Tel Aviv, published in Quirk’s Marketing Research Review, demonstrates how a Monte Carlo simulation analyzed the primary survey research in a market forecast feasibility study about bringing a chain of upscale Mexican restaurants to Israel’s Silicon Valley.